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Hanging Storage for Oversize Rolled Objects

Purpose

This hanging housing system is designed for objects that are too large for flat files or unlikely to be accessed often, such as artwork, posters, textiles, and theatre backdrops.

Author(s)

Angela M. Andres
Special Collections Conservator
New York University Libraries
70 Washington Square South, Room LL2-25
New York, NY 10012
212-992-9017
mailto:angela.andres@nyu.edu
http://library.nyu.edu/preservation/

Laura McCann
Conservation Librarian
New York University Libraries
70 Washington Square South, Room LL2-25
New York, NY 10012
212-998-2562
mailto:laura.mccann@nyu.edu
http://library.nyu.edu/preservation/

Photos: Laura McCann

Publication: 2016 

 

Description

Objects are rolled around archival tubes and suspended with S-hooks from the cage in stack areas (or eye-hooks may be secured into wall if cage is not available) to make efficient use of limited available space (Fig.1). Pressure-mounted stiff archival foam bumpers support the tubes and protect the rolled objects from pressure against the wall or cage (Fig.2). S-hooks and bumpers can be easily shifted or removed as necessary.

FIGURE 1: Oversize rolled objects hanging from stack cages.

FIGURE 1: Oversize rolled objects hanging from stack cages.

FIGURE 2: Detail of foam bumper supporting tube.

FIGURE 2: Detail of foam bumper supporting tube.

 

Materials, Tools & Supplies

• Rope (or chain)
• Archival storage tubes (diameter 4.5-6 inches)
• S-hooks
• Stiff archival foam
• Polyester film, archival tissue, or plain muslin
• Cotton ties
• Hacksaw
• Drill (power or manual)
• Foam cutting knife

Construction

Cut tube to desired length with a hacksaw (approximately 4 inches total wider than the object) and drill a set of two holes at each end. The holes should be about one inch apart and set about one inch in from the tube edges. Roll the objects around the tube using an appropriate barrier material between the tube and object and a similarly appropriate material for the outer protective layer (polyester film, silicone release polyester film or paper, archival tissue, or plain muslin are all options depending on the type of object being rolled). Thread rope through the holes and tie off tightly inside the tube (chain may be used instead). Cut two foam bumpers to fit the tube’s diameter. Attach S-hooks to the cage grid at the desired height and width and loop each rope around a hook.

Comments

Stack cages should be thoroughly inspected prior to using for this purpose to ensure they are properly anchored and able to support the weight of the tubes. If stack cages are not available, gridwall panels such as those used in retail displays may be attached (again, properly and securely) to walls and the tubes hung from the grid panels.

Adapted From

This housing was previously discussed in the webinar, The Big, the Weird, and the Bulky: Housing Solutions for Objects in Library and Archival Collections, October 1, 2014, presented by Angela Andres and Laura McCann and hosted by ALCTS, Association for Library Collections and Technical Services.

Keywords

rolled storage, textile, oversize, art, hanging storage

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