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Hanging textile collections using common materials

Purpose

This technique uniquely utilizes general materials to formulate a hanging system for textile collections and can be custom designed and constructed to fit on any wall. It provides easy and safe access to all objects while maximizing the use of available space within a storage room.

Figure 1. View of the hanging system with team members reintroducing the collection into the storage room (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0002).

Figure 1. View of the hanging system with team members reintroducing the collection into the storage room (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0002).

Author(s)

Alicia Ghadban
Phone: 613-262-8730
Email: alicia.ghadban@gmail.com

Simon Lambert
Canadian Conservation Institute
1030 Innes Road
Ottawa, ON K1B 4S7
Phone: (613) 998-3721 ext. 255
Email: simon.lambert@canada.ca

Website: Margaret Mulrooney
Colchester Historeum
29 Young Street
Truro, NS B2N 5C5
Phone: (902) 895-6284
Email: curator@colchesterhistoreum.ca

Illustration & Photo Credits: Canadian Conservation Institute

Publication: 2016

Description

Figure 2. Team members are captured installing the wall bracket and dowel system. (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0013).

Figure 2. Team members are captured installing the wall bracket and dowel system. (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0013).

Prior to conducting a storage reorganization project, the textile collection was hung in a single row in a series of units, with underutilized space above [Fig. 1]. A solution to use the full height of the room seemed ideal, so the idea of creating a two-tiered hanging rod system was developed. This system was composed of wall brackets, dowels and strips of plywood that were attached to the walls of the storage room, and provided more space for the installation of compact shelving units.

Materials, Tools & Supplies

  • Metal wall brackets
  • Table saw
  • Drill
  • Wood strapping (3.5” wide, 1” deep)
    Figure 3. Close-up of the wall bracket and dowel, attached to a strip of wood (© Colchester Historeum).

    Figure 3. Close-up of the wall bracket and dowel, attached to a strip of wood (© Colchester Historeum).

  • Stud finder
  • Dowels
  • Ruler / measuring tape
  • Misc. (screws, nails, etc.)

 

Construction

  1. Measure the length of the wall where the system will be installed. You should also group your textiles by size and measure the height in order to determine how many levels can be installed on one wall.
  2. Using the same measurement, cut the dowel and strapping to size using the table saw.
  3. Using the stud finder, locate and mark where it is safe to install the straps on the wall.
    Figure 4. Final view of the textile collection installed on the dowel and bracket system (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0011).

    Figure 4. Final view of the textile collection installed on the dowel and bracket system (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0011).eywords

    Ensure adequate vertical space is provided for the hanging collection, and then attach the straps to the wall using screws.
  4. Secure the metal wall bracket to the straps using the drill and screws. Repeat until sufficient wall brackets are evenly spaced apart and provide adequate support for the potential weight of the collection.
  5. Place the dowel on the hooks of all metal brackets.
  6. Reintroduce the collection by hanging them on the dowel.

 

Adapted From

RE-ORG.” 2011. ICCROM and UNESCO.

 

Keywords

Textiles, hanging system

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