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Adaptive re-use of wood material for hanging long and thin objects on less utilized spaces

Purpose

This system uniquely utilizes space that would generally be ignored or deemed unusable, while adapting and re-using material that was previously used to store other material object types. It can be custom designed and constructed to fit on architectural features such as slanted walls to provide easy and safe access, and to maximize the use of available space.

Figure 4. Final view of hanging long and thin objects on pegboard, and mounted to the storage room’s slanted wall (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0009).

Figure 1. Final view of hanging long and thin objects on pegboard, and mounted to the storage room’s slanted wall (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0009).

Author(s)

Alicia Ghadban
Phone: 613-262-8730
Email: alicia.ghadban@gmail.com

Simon Lambert
Canadian Conservation Institute
1030 Innes Road
Ottawa, ON K1B 4S7
Phone: (613) 998-3721 ext. 255
Email: simon.lambert@canada.ca

Website: Margaret Mulrooney
Colchester Historeum
29 Young Street
Truro, NS B2N 5C5
Phone: (902) 895-6284
Email: curator@colchesterhistoreum.ca

Illustration & Photo Credits: Canadian Conservation Institute

Publication: 2016

 

Figure 1. Initial view of the hanging textile collection stored in wooden shelving units (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0005).

Figure 2. Initial view of the hanging textile collection stored in wooden shelving units (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0005).

Description

While conducting a storage reorganization project, it was decided that some of the existing hanging textile collection that had been stored in wooden shelving units would be rehoused and the wood material would be reused for new storage solutions. The wood shelves were enclosed with pegboard, and once the collection had safely been relocated, the wooden shelves were disassembled, and the pegboard set aside for mounting long and thin objects. Objects were first wrapped in acid-free tissue paper, and then attached to the pegboard using unbleached cotton tying tape. Once all objects were affixed, the pegboard was securely attached to strapping on a slanted wall in the storage room.

Materials, Tools & Supplies

  • Pegboard
  • Saw
  • Acid-free tissue paper
  • Wood strapping (1” deep)
  • Drill
  • Unbleached cotton tying tape
  • Scissors
  • Ruler / measuring tape
  • Misc. (screws, rivets, washers, etc.)
Figure 2. General view of wooden units with collection removed (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0006).

Figure 3. General view of wooden units with collection removed (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0006).

Construction

  1. Measure the location that will house the pegboard.
  2. If necessary, cut the pegboard to size using a saw.
  3. Screw wood straps to the wall where the edge of the pegboard will go.
  4. Identify objects to be stored on the pegboard.
  5. Individually wrap each object using acid-free tissue paper.
  6. Attach the wrapped objects to the pegboard by using unbleached cotton tying tape [Figure 3]. Do this by looping the tying tape through the holes of the pegboard, then placing the object between the loops and tying around the front side of the pegboard. (Remember to attach labels for easy artifact identification)
  7. Using rivets and washers, secure the pegboard to the wood straps using a drill while adequate support is provided by other team members.
    Figure 3. Team member, Lesley Caseley, is captured looping unbleached cotton tying tape through the holes of the pegboard (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0012).

    Figure 4. Team member, Lesley Caseley, is captured looping unbleached cotton tying tape through the holes of the pegboard (© Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute. CCI 128843-0012).

 

Comments

The addition of wood straps (1” deep) between the wall and pegboard not only provided extra stability, but also space, so a bent needle (or paperclip) can be used to grab and slip the unbleached cotton tying tape through the pegboard for attaching or re-attaching objects. If working above an open shelf unit, temporarily relocate the objects on the top shelf to avoid any mishaps.

Adapted From

RE-ORG.” 2011. ICCROM and UNESCO.

 

Keywords

Pegboard

 

 

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